Corbetts starting with S
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Results pages
«« 1 2 3 4 »»
Sail Gharbh
Sail Gharbh is the more northerly and highest of the three corbetts that comprise the magnificent mountain Quinag located in Sutherland.

The main ridge of Quinag runs SSE to NNW, with a Corbett at either end. The W slopes forming a long uninterrupted wall of crags and scree, however the E slopes are dissected by two great corries to form a third ridge (NE) on which is Sail Gharbh the highest peak and the true summit of Quinag.

There are few easy ascents onto Quinag, the SE slopes of Spidean Coinich , and at the heads of the two great corries being the most obvious. Other ascents are best left to the more experienced route finders.

Sail Ghorm
Sail Ghorm is the more northerly and second highest of the three Corbetts that comprise the magnificent mountain Quinag.

The main ridge of Quinag runs SSE to NNW, with a Corbett at either end. The W slopes forming a long uninterrupted wall of crags and scree, however the E slopes are dissected by two great corries to form a third NE ridge on which is the highest top (Sail Gharbh 808m ) and the true summit of Quinag.

There are few easy ascents onto Quinag, the SE slopes of Spidean Coinich , and at the heads of the two great corries being the most obvious. Other ascents are best left to the more experienced route finders.

Sail Mhor
Sail Mhor, one of the smallest Corbetts, is effectively an outlying top of the An Teallach group, with views up Coire Mor an Teallaich to the craggy tops of that classic mountain.

There are two ridges, the longer runs NW to Sail Bheag (409m) and a shorter ridge S to Ruigh Mheallain where a bealach connects it to Sgurr Ruadh (761m) on the S rim of Coire Mor an Teallaich.

Sail Mhor has a compact steep and craggy summit cone on all but the S where the ascent is much easier.

Sgor Mor
Sgor Mor is the highest top of a sprawling mountain that occupies the space between Glen Lui, Glen Luibeg and Glen Dee. The main ridge runs WSW to ENE with Sgor Mor at the W end and Sgor Dubh (741m) at the E end. The slopes at either end of this ridge are steep and craggy, especially below Sgor Dubh.

To the N of the main ridge there are gentle slopes down to Glen Luibeg and there is one subsidiary top Creagan nan Gabhar (722m) to the NW of Sgor Mor. To the S of the main ridge there is a broad plateau, 600-650m in altitude, and on the edge of the plateau two more subsidiary tops Carn Mor (634m) and Carn an 'lc Duibhe (630m).

Due to the network of paths/tracks around it, Sgor Mor can be ascended from many directions.

Sgorr Craobh a' Chaorainn
Sgorr Craobh a' Chaorainn and Sgurr Ghiubhsachain are the two highest peaks on the rocky head-wall of Coire Ghiubhsachain. They are attached at a col (593m) which is deemed a sufficient drop for them to be considered separate Corbetts yet they are undeniably part of the same mountain mass and should be climbed together.

The rocky NNE ridge of Sgurr Ghiubhsachain connects to Meall a' Choire-Chruinn then tapers down to Guesachan Cottage were there is a road giving good access. The other possible ascent route is via Meall na Cuartaige on the ENE ridge of Sgorr Craobh a' Chaorainn which leads to a path by the Allt na Cruaiche.

Sgorr na Diollaid
Sgorr na Diollaid is a hill of easy slopes with a few scattered crags overlooking the E end of Glen Cannich.

It is accessible from the road through Glen Cannich and also from Glen Strathfarrar via the path through Coire nam Brathan which branches and leads onto Meall a' Mhadaidh (684m) the most E top.

From Meall a' Mhadaidh a ridge ascends WSW to Sgorr na Diollaid then WSW to un-named top (777m) W to another un-named top (713m) and finally SSW to An Soutar (680m).

Sgorr nan Lochan Uaine
Sgorr nan Lochan Uaine is one of several summits on high moorland to the N of Beinn Liath Mor , the green loch from which it gets its name separating the two peaks.

To the N lies the smaller but much rougher and more impressive Sgurr Dubh with which it is normally climbed.

Sgorr nan Lochan Uaine is a hill of generally easy slopes and few scattered rocky outcrops.

Sguman Coinntich
Sguman Coinntich and Ben Killilan (754m) are two elongated hills separated by Coire Mor but connected at their E ends by Bealach Mhic Bheathain (755m) making a pleasant circular route.

Sguman Coinntich has many rocky outcrops but the slopes are not particularly steep and it is easy to navigate round the rocks. The long E ridge of Sguman Coinntich offers a high level route to Faochaig .

Sgurr a' Chaorachain [Applecross]
Sgurr a' Chaorachain is one of the two hills that flank Scotland's highest road, the Bealach na Ba (Pass of the Cattle), on the route to Applecross.

It is part of a range of hills that have been eroded on their E faces to form an impressive line of crags.

Sgurr a'Chaorachain lies to the N of the Coire na Ba and is an easy walk from the highest point of the bealach, but it is a more interesting ascent as a scramble from Coire a' Chaorachain.

Sgurr a' Choire-bheithe
Sgurr a' Choire-bheithe and its southern neighbour, Ben Aden are two remote Corbetts in the Rough Bounds of Knoydart.

The possible approaches are a long walk in from Kinloch Hourn, or by boat to Inverie and another long walk so be prepared to stay at least one night. With either route you will face un-bridged river crossings. Accessing these hills is a serious undertaking requiring good judgement and careful navigation - never exclude the possibility of going home to climb another day.

These are rough craggy hills which are seldom climbed and you may have to select your own route through the rocks and crags, however with good route selection you should not face more than minor scrambling.

Results pages
«« 1 2 3 4 »»
Privacy Policy Cookie Policy Contact Us