Corbetts starting with B
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Beinn Bhuidhe [Knoydart]
Beinn Bhuidhe lies on a long ridge to the S of Gleann Meadail, on the Knoydart Penninsula, and the easiest approach is by the path over Mam Meadail at the head of the Glen.

It is 7km from Mam Meadail to Loch Bhraomisaig on a route that takes you over rocky tops and along ridges which are narrow in places, so give yourself plenty of time. Particularly as you will still have steep descent from Loch Bhraomisaig to Gleann Meadail and you should avoid doing so in the dark.

Beinn Bhuidhe is a rough craggy hill especially on its N face, but other routes from Gleann Meadail onto the ridge are possible if the whole traverse does not appeal to you.

Beinn Chaorach
Beinn Chaorach is a conical mountain elongated N to S with no subsidiary ridges. It is generally a grassy hill but has a few rocky outcrops SE of the summit.

It is an easy hill to climb, especially from the S where tracks lead to its lower slopes, but it is usually accessed from Beinn Odhar to the W or Cam Chreag to the NE, to which it is connected by a high col (640m).

Beinn Chuirn
Beinn Chuirn is the highest peak in a short range of hills located between Glen Lochy and Glen Cononish and can be ascended from either glen.

The shorter route is from Glen Lochy and this also avoids the mining activity on the southern slopes of this mountain. The Glen Lochy approach requires the River Lochy to be crossed, there is a rail bridge but no foot bridge at this point.

Beinn Chuirn is a craggy hill but the rocky outcrops are scattered and can be avoided.

Beinn Dearg Bheag
Beinn Dearg Bheag and Beinn Dearg Mor are two remote mountains accessible from Corrie Hallie to the NE or on the track by the Gruinard River starting from the A832 in Gruinard Bay to the NW.

Both routes involve un-bridged river crossings which may be dangerous when the water is high. The traditional route from Corrie Hallie gives the best views of these impressive mountains.

Beinn Dearg Bheag is a craggy topped hill with the summit located towards the centre of a ridge that runs NW from the col that connects it to Beinn Dearg Mor.

Beinn Dearg Mor
Beinn Dearg Mor and Beinn Dearg Bheag are two remote mountains accessible from Corrie Hallie to the NE or on the track by the Gruinard River starting from the A832 in Guinard Bay to the NW. Both routes involve un-bridged river crossings which may be dangerous when water levels are high.

The traditional route from Corrie Hallie gives the best views of this impressive mountain. Beinn Dearg Mor is the larger 90m, it has a rocky top and steep frequently craggy slopes. It has four distinct ridges radiating NNE, E, SSE and WNW from the summit, the latter ridge leading down to a col which leads to Beinn Dearg Bheag.

Beinn Dearg [Glen Lyon]
Beinn Dearg is a compact mountain, the SE face of which has been eroded to form a deep corrie, the Cul Lairig.

Beinn Dearg has one ridge which curves around the Cul Lairig to end in a subsidiary top Creag Ard (741m), and is linked to Carn Gorm to the NE at a high col (630m). The W and N slopes of Beinn Dearg are more gentle and offer easy access, but the E and S slopes are much steeper and rocky in places.

The track to the W through Lairig Ghallabhaich offers a good approach route onto the W slopes.

Beinn Dearg [Torridon]
Beinn Dearg is just one metre short of a Munro and is the highest of the Corbetts.

From Beinn Dearg a summit a ridge runs NNW to Stuc Loch na Cabhaig which lies across the Bealach a' Chomhla from Na Rathanan, The Horns of Alligin.

A much longer ridge runs E over an un-named top to Carn na Feola (761m). The E ridge has two spurs on its N face producing two corries.

This is a steep sided mountain with some very craggy slopes. Perhaps the most appealling feature of Beinn Dearg is its location, giving superb views of Beinn Alligin , Liathach and Beinn Eighe .

Beinn Dronaig
Beinn Dronaig is a very remote mountain in the depths of the Attadale Forest. There is a very long approach but this can be cycled as far as Bendronaig Lodge.

Beinn Dronaig is a distinct hill with a curved ridge from Carn Poll-eisg ENE to Beinn Dronaig then E turning ESE. A path at this end of the ridge leads down to Loch Calavie, from where a path leads back to Bendronaig Lodge.

The N slopes of Beinn Dronaig are easy to moderate and scattered with rocky outcrops, but the S slopes are crag free.

Beinn Each
Beinn Each lies on the horse-shoe of hills that forms the headwall of Gleann a' Chroin. It lies across the glen from Stuc a' Chroin , to which it is connected by Bealach nan Cabar.

Beinn Each is located to the N of a ridge which divides S of Meall na Caora to form two gently rounded ridges, and is the highest peak to the S of Gleann a' Chroin.

It has a compact rocky summit, but is an easy hill to climb. As it overlooks Glen Ample, this is the easiest approach route, but the slopes are fairly steep.

Beinn Enaiglair
Beinn Enaiglair and Beinn Dearg lie at the head of Coire Mhucarnaich separated by Iorguill (872m) and consequently can be climbed together.

Beinn Enaiglair is much more accessible than Beinn Dearg and is approached by paths from Lochdrum to the SE and Braemore junction to the SW. These paths meet and completely surround the summit.

Beinn Enaiglair has a few scattered crags on its N slopes but otherwise makes for an easy ascent. This hill has two main ridges, NNW and ESE and two smaller ones S and NE.

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